Printing methods

The personalisation of t-shirts and other items, from as few as a single unit, requires a range of specific and often complex printing techniques compared to long runs of hundreds or thousands of traditional units.

For production from a single unit, there isn't an optimal technique that covers all types of designs and t-shirts. Here at Tostadora, we have specialised in the following three different methods to offer the best of all worlds based on the type of design and garment you need while still ensuring the highest quality of the end product.


1) Direct To Garment

Direct printing is the latest technology for personalisation and allows for single unit runs. It offers quality and a finish similar to screen printing (sometimes even better!) but from single units. (Screen printing requires at least 30 units to get an acceptable cost per shirt.)

We print all designs uploaded by users in PNG or JPG using this technique. We can print solid colours, designs with hundreds of colours and gradients, and also text. In short, anything that can be output from a PNG or JPG file.
impresión directa

Advantages:
  • Supports 16 million colours.
  • Screen printing quality from as few as a one unit.
  • Ideal for designs with that look irregular, distressed, have multiple strokes, etc.
Disadvantages:
  • High cost of printing for long runs.
  • It may last somewhat less than traditional screen printing.
  • Can present slight imperfections, especially in solid colors/drawings.

2) Industrial Transfer

Industrial transfer (in all variants), is a silkscreen applied in reverse order with plastisol inks on a easy-release support with a final thermoadhesive layer. Depending on the type, it may have a slightly different finish. Then, using a heat press, this print is transferred onto the garment.

The quality is virtually the same as screen printing and the finish is very soft and durable. Variants of industrial transfer are embossed transfer, Hot Split transfer, Foil transfer, Diamond Effect transfer, and industry transfer.


3) Printing with Vinyl Cut

Vinyl Cut is a thin layer of polyurethane cut with a vector cutting machine, then pressed onto the garment at high temperatures until it literally melts onto the material of your future garment.

Used on underwear and occasionally other items when application may be difficult.

Advantages:
  • Vinyl Cut is a thin layer of polyurethane cut with a vector cutting machine, then pressed onto the garment at high temperatures until it literally melts onto the material of your future garment.
  • Used on underwear and occasionally other items when application may be difficult.
  • Vinyl Cut never loses colour after washing; it maintains a solid and bright colour forever.
  • It has the same finish on both dark and light coloured garments.

Disadvantages:
  • Complicated for large production runs, slow and expensive.
  • The designs (not the text) have a maximum of 3 colours.


Washing Instructions:
  • Wash inside out.
  • Wash with cold water. Never wash in temperatures more than 30º C.
  • Do not bleach.
  • Do not tumble dry after washing (dryers destroy everything, including the fabric)
  • Do not iron the print.